Oscar dialled Ava’s  number. “Hey Oscar.”

“Hi, just wanted to let you know that I’m probably coming out of hospital tomorrow morning.”

“Good.”

“Ava, are you okay?”

“It’s just this horrible back ache.”

“Do you have painkillers?”

“Yep. Ring me when you’re coming out of hospital. I’ll pick you up, don’t worry I’ll be fine to drive, oh crap wait , your car is in Clatterbridge. Okay, scratch that. I’ll get a single ticket and then pick you up and drive you back. How does that sound?”

“I can drive back myself or even get the train.”

“No I’d really rather you didn’t, don’t worry, I’ll come for you.”

“Why are you being nice to me Ava?”

“Don’t mention it. See you tomorrow. I just need to rescue my chilli concarne from the oven!”

Oh God,  he hadn’t mentioned his hair. Reluctantly Oscar took off his hat, shaking the loose strands of hair into his bedside bin. He gazed at his patchy hairline in the mirror. ‘I really would just be best shaving the rest off.’ He thought, placing his hat back on.

“I’m just doing my rounds I like to my own obs if I have time. Can I just do your blood pressure?”

“Sure Milly.” She gently took his blood pressure, glancing over his chart.

“105/80. There you go, I’ll just take your temperature. 37.2 degrees, that’s much better.”

“Thank God for that!  I feel tired, but so much better than I did.”

“I’m glad.” She smiled. “How are you managing with food?”

“Better. I had a banana at about 8.30am, soup for lunch and I’ve just eaten a small tangerine.”

“Ah yes and I see that you’ve been drinking plenty. Well, you’re certainly taking all the right steps. You just need to make sure that you continue eating enough when you go home. It will be hard, it might help to keep a food diary. Have you had your ensure?”

“I will soon.”

“Don’t be surprised if you lose more weight over the next few weeks.”

“Okay.”

Milly glanced at the clock. “You just have 20 minutes to go before I can take your drip down.”

“Thank God! I’m dying for another shower, would that be alright?”

“I don’t see why not Oscar.”

“Great, thanks.”

***

“There we go that’s down now.”

“Do I have to do anything different when showering at home?”

“There’s no restrictions. I mean, don’t submerge your central line in the bath and of course, be careful not to knock it. We’ll give you some more waterproof covers.”

“Okay.”

“Are you alright walking to the bathroom? ”

“Yes.”

Oscar slid his legs over the edge of the bed, placing his hand on the cabinet for support.

“I feel steady enough.”

“Okay good.  I’ll walk with you and carry your things. Make sure that you sit down on the little seat in the shower. The last thing that you want to do is fall. Don’t use soap or gel near the line. The dressing is waterproof. This one is free. There you go, I’ll just place your things on here. Are you okay with working the shower?”

“Yeah.”

“I’ll leave you in peace then. Ring your bell when you’ve done. I’ll get one of the HCA’s to change your bed for you.”

Oscar nodded, locking the bathroom door securely behind him. He held onto the bar at the side in attempt to prevent his trembling legs from shaking. Oscar removed his hat, emptying the noticeable collection of hair into the bin. Dare he? Surely it was better than having missing clumps of hair, it was all going to fall soon anyway. Without any second thoughts, he took out his electric razor and shakily removed his remaining hair. Oscar washed quickly, taking extra care to avoid his central line. Still sat on the seat, Oscar dried himself, applying body spray and deodorant and pulled on a fresh pair of shorts and a T-shirt. There came a small knock on the door.

“Oscar, are you okay?”

“Yes.”

He dried his head, pulling on his hat, slippers and dressing gown before collecting his things and exiting his bathroom. He felt his scorching forehead. Milly passed the door semi-open door.

I’ll walk you back. You look a little flushed. Those bathrooms get so stuffy!”

“Tell me about it. I’ll have to turn my fan up again. I feel refreshed though and I think I managed to avoid my central line pretty well. I’ll have a quick nap.”

“No problem.”

“I can’t tell you what a relief it is to have that drip down!”

“I can imagine. How will you get home when you’re discharged?”

“Oh, erm I think someone is picking me up.”

“Good, that’s what I wanted to hear.”

“Am I right in thinking I don’t have to have chemo in between hospital visits? That’s something I’m not very sure of.”

“You’ve had your induction,  the next stage is consolidation to make sure that the cells don’t come back and then there’s the maintenance stage. When you go home, you’ll be having a rest period before you return for your next check up.”

“How long is the rest period?”

“Doctor Cassidy will do another bone marrow aspiration in two weeks time to see whether the Leukaemia has gone into remission.”

To be continued…

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12 thoughts on “Planchette- Part 132

      1. Thought it take your mind off of cancer and toxic relationships. You must have some nursing in your history.

  1. I think you are drawing this out a little. Maybe eliminate anything mundane. I know it’s hard to kill your baby, but you want to amke the story exciting for your readers.
    One nit: “There we go that’s down now.” This should be two sentences.

    1. I really don’t want to kill the baby, I have no idea what to do any more if I’m honest, I realise that I have to end it soon, but don’t know how.

  2. Yes, I agree with Francene, it may be time for the action to change course, or to draw to a conclusion here? Oscar has suffered quite a bit. It would be great to see something good happen in his life.

  3. Sounds like everything is on the edge of happening – his release, the baby coming, and relationships with the women in his life.

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